Technologically and linguistically adventurous EFL teacher

I’m putting together some activities to help students understand more fluent English speech, ready for a seminar on listening skills I’m running next weekend.  One of the activities is micro-dictations of common questions spoken at as normal a speed as possible. It can be difficult to find things like this ready-prepared, so I’ve recorded some and embedded them here:

What’s your name?
Where are you from?
What do you do?
What are you going to have?
What are you going to do tomorrow?
Did you have a good holiday?


Listening attentivelyI’d be interested to hear how you use them.

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Comments on: "Questions for micro-dictations" (10)

  1. nice post , i wonder if making it would be useful making recordings more “authentic” by using corpus information e.g. StringNet interface shows the construction – what be [pos pn] name has sometimes erm/er/and before it – http://www.lexchecker.org/hyngram/hyngram_relation.php?hyngram_cjson=%5B4757,%20161,%201737,%2030161%5D&meta_offset=194582673&relation=expand&target_na1_i=0#

    ta
    mura

    • That sounds like an interesting idea Mura. I just came up with these while I was putting the post together, but I might try that in the future. Thanks!
      Sandy

  2. […] I'm putting together some activities to help students understand more fluent English speech, ready for a seminar on listening skills I'm running next weekend. One of the activities is micro-dictat…  […]

  3. you post the good audio question for learning , so i appriciate you for this good work .

  4. Very useful …..

  5. […] I'm putting together some activities to help students understand more fluent English speech, ready for a seminar on listening skills I'm running next weekend. One of the activities is micro-dictat…  […]

  6. […] I'm putting together some activities to help students understand more fluent English speech, ready for a seminar on listening skills I'm running next weekend. One of the activities is micro-dictat…  […]

  7. […] I'm putting together some activities to help students understand more fluent English speech, ready for a seminar on listening skills I'm running next weekend. One of the activities is micro-dictat…  […]

  8. […] I'm putting together some activities to help students understand more fluent English speech, ready for a seminar on listening skills I'm running next weekend. One of the activities is micro-dictat…  […]

  9. Gosh darn it, I’d never noticed this post before, but it’s almost exactly what I’ve been doing with my students!

    I’m working on creating a bank of recordings that use different reduced forms. In one week, for example, we might focus on sentences said quickly that can a question word with an auxiliary.. “what do you want?” “what are you thinking”, and so on. Another session might focus on modal verbs, etc.

    I’ve basically been getting inspiration from lists of the most common words in spoken English, since these seem to correlate nicely with words that get reduced in normal speech. But, as Mura observes above, there is probably scope to widen this out to include chunks. If anyone can help with figuring out the practicalities of that, I’d love to collaborate…

    Ideally I’d like these recordings to be available in a variety of native speaker and near-native speaker accents.

    If anyone would like to help, look me up! :)

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